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Move over CCTV; Enter a new dynasty in Chinese television
David Jerke
1/19/2004



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The lights dimmed, the curtains rose…and in roared the lions and the dragons. Thus, the Year of the Monkey was ushered in, and a new era in Chinese-language media officially began.

For years, the Chinese Communist Party-owned China Central Television (CCTV) has dominated the worldwide airwaves for Chinese speakers, and the cornerstone of its dominance has been its annual Chinese New Year celebration.

Enter the new kid on the block.

Or, shall we say, the new dynasty on the block – New Tang Dynasty that is. The upstart TV station founded by North American Chinese immigrants two years ago unfolded its Inaugural Chinese New Year Gala in New York - a program intended to compete head on with CCTV.

From the opening dragon dance to the resounding Tang dynastical finale, the multi-cultural and multi-lingual performances of music, dance, and more left a packed house awestruck, in tears, and speechless.

Named for the dynasty considered to be “the most glorious era in Chinese history,” the two-year old New Tang Dynasty TV station intends to broadcast an edited version of the two-night performance to an estimated 50 million households.

Given that China is the world’s largest authoritarian state and one that Reporters Without Borders ranks 248th on a list of 249 for press freedom, we can be assured that the Communist Party will actively and vigorously block NTDTV’s satellite signals.

Still, for those fortunate enough to receive the signals in Mainland China, this broadcast may be the first to enter their household that originated from a TV station that promotes peace, freedom, and human rights.

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