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Copyright law to be discussed
AFAR
12/16/2002

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In an attempt to further protect intellectual property, Japan’s Agency for Cultural Affairs hopes to extend the copyright protection period for movies to 70 years, up from the current 50-year period. This would bring the protection period for movies closer to that stipulated for other materials by the existing Copyright Law, which protects novels, paintings, and some other non-movie materials for 50 years after the creators’ passing. The Agency, a branch of the Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology Ministry, is expected to present a bill to revise the Copyright Law to the Diet session in January.

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